THE GIG

aka Nate Chinen

poetrysociety:

Shel Silverstein’s  book of poetry A Light in the Attic (1981) was challenged and then banned at Cunningham Elementary School in Wisconsin because it “encourages children to break dishes so they won’t have to dry them.”

First poem I ever memorized View high resolution

poetrysociety:

Shel Silverstein’s  book of poetry A Light in the Attic (1981) was challenged and then banned at Cunningham Elementary School in Wisconsin because it “encourages children to break dishes so they won’t have to dry them.”

First poem I ever memorized

Snapped a pic for research, in an SNL green room. The inscription is quoted in this piece, coming to your nearest Arts & Leisure section soon: http://nyti.ms/1m172CM View high resolution

Snapped a pic for research, in an SNL green room. The inscription is quoted in this piece, coming to your nearest Arts & Leisure section soon: http://nyti.ms/1m172CM

last Saturday’s panel at Newport, with John Szwed, Henry Louis Gates, Jr. and Ingrid Monson #latergram #phew View high resolution

last Saturday’s panel at Newport, with John Szwed, Henry Louis Gates, Jr. and Ingrid Monson #latergram #phew


"Yet if Giuffre is largely unacknowledged as a pioneer, he perhaps has only himself to blame. The extraordinary diversity of his musical output has made the exact nature of his contributions to jazz difficult to pinpoint for all but his most devoted fans. Yet with a little effort one can trace many lineages through Giuffre’s oeuvre, and more than one contemporary school of jazz could look to him as a forbear. Homage from the younger generation (whether of musicians or critics) has not, however, been at all apparent. Nor is it likely to be forthcoming.”
— Ted Gioia, West Coast Jazz: Modern Jazz in California, 1945-1960 (University of California Press, 1998)

Today is the release date for The Jimmy Giuffre 3 & 4: New York Concerts, a double album of previously unissued music recorded in 1965. I wrote about Giuffre and his legacy for a piece in Sunday’s Arts & Leisure section, mainly focusing on the rise and fall of his fortunes in the late 1950s and early ’60s, which set the stage for a “lost decade” that these ‘65 recordings help illuminate. 
The piece had a strong subtext, which was Giuffre’s creeping resurgence as an influence and touchstone for younger composer-improvisers. I spoke with a few such musicians who have albums out or forthcoming, like trumpeter Dave Douglas and trombonist Samuel Blaser; I also spoke with drummer George Schuller, who has co-led a Giuffre rep band. Because it was a general-interest story and there were already so many important names flying around — Swallow! Bley! Brookmeyer! Hall! — I opted not to go much further in the “and hey, look who else digs Giuffre” department. So, no mention of Chris Speed, Ben Goldberg or James Falzone, who have all been Giuffre fans for some time.
I don’t regret those omissions, really, though I understand why someone looking for a different sort of article might. I do regret not giving some props to Ken Vandermark, whose Free Fall band (with Håvard Wiik on piano and Ingebrigt Håker Flaten on bass) was obviously named after Giuffre’s epochal 1962 album. When I thought about Vandermark, I mistakenly remembered Free Fall as an older project; had I realized that its most recent album was recorded in 2008, I surely would have included KV in the story, even though Free Fall is listed on his website as “on hiatus.”
In the end, I’m just happy that Jimmy Giuffre got some play in Arts & Leisure, and that I was able to get across some of what made him unique. As we know from recent history — cf. the Ted Gioia quote above — it was anything but a given that younger musicians would come around this way. And it’s heartening to think that there’s more still to come, especially once everyone has a chance to absorb the new release. View high resolution

"Yet if Giuffre is largely unacknowledged as a pioneer, he perhaps has only himself to blame. The extraordinary diversity of his musical output has made the exact nature of his contributions to jazz difficult to pinpoint for all but his most devoted fans. Yet with a little effort one can trace many lineages through Giuffre’s oeuvre, and more than one contemporary school of jazz could look to him as a forbear. Homage from the younger generation (whether of musicians or critics) has not, however, been at all apparent. Nor is it likely to be forthcoming.

— Ted Gioia, West Coast Jazz: Modern Jazz in California, 1945-1960 (University of California Press, 1998)

Today is the release date for The Jimmy Giuffre 3 & 4: New York Concerts, a double album of previously unissued music recorded in 1965. I wrote about Giuffre and his legacy for a piece in Sunday’s Arts & Leisure section, mainly focusing on the rise and fall of his fortunes in the late 1950s and early ’60s, which set the stage for a “lost decade” that these ‘65 recordings help illuminate. 

The piece had a strong subtext, which was Giuffre’s creeping resurgence as an influence and touchstone for younger composer-improvisers. I spoke with a few such musicians who have albums out or forthcoming, like trumpeter Dave Douglas and trombonist Samuel Blaser; I also spoke with drummer George Schuller, who has co-led a Giuffre rep band. Because it was a general-interest story and there were already so many important names flying around — Swallow! Bley! Brookmeyer! Hall! — I opted not to go much further in the “and hey, look who else digs Giuffre” department. So, no mention of Chris Speed, Ben Goldberg or James Falzone, who have all been Giuffre fans for some time.

I don’t regret those omissions, really, though I understand why someone looking for a different sort of article might. I do regret not giving some props to Ken Vandermark, whose Free Fall band (with Håvard Wiik on piano and Ingebrigt Håker Flaten on bass) was obviously named after Giuffre’s epochal 1962 album. When I thought about Vandermark, I mistakenly remembered Free Fall as an older project; had I realized that its most recent album was recorded in 2008, I surely would have included KV in the story, even though Free Fall is listed on his website as “on hiatus.”

In the end, I’m just happy that Jimmy Giuffre got some play in Arts & Leisure, and that I was able to get across some of what made him unique. As we know from recent history — cf. the Ted Gioia quote above — it was anything but a given that younger musicians would come around this way. And it’s heartening to think that there’s more still to come, especially once everyone has a chance to absorb the new release.

You really couldn’t have dreamed up a better joint than the Players club, on a beautiful spring evening, for the second annual New York Hot Jazz Festival. To quote clarinetist Ken Peplowski, from the stage: “This is just a marvelous event; long may it last.” (I  have my misgivings about the current retro-jazz boomlet, but they were pretty thoroughly disarmed here.) View high resolution

You really couldn’t have dreamed up a better joint than the Players club, on a beautiful spring evening, for the second annual New York Hot Jazz Festival. To quote clarinetist Ken Peplowski, from the stage: “This is just a marvelous event; long may it last.” (I  have my misgivings about the current retro-jazz boomlet, but they were pretty thoroughly disarmed here.)

mosaicrecords:

Joshua Redman Interviews Sonny Rollins

This 2005 interview of Sonny Rollins by Joshua Redman is a revelation. Like Stanley Crouch’s later profile of Rollins in The New Yorker, this conversation draws Sonny back to his formative childhood days in Harlem in the ‘30s, a fascinating period in Black American cultural history.

-Michael Cuscuna

Read Interview…


Follow: Mosaic Records Facebook Tumblr Twitter

Yes and yes. View high resolution

mosaicrecords:

Joshua Redman Interviews Sonny Rollins

This 2005 interview of Sonny Rollins by Joshua Redman is a revelation. Like Stanley Crouch’s later profile of Rollins in The New Yorker, this conversation draws Sonny back to his formative childhood days in Harlem in the ‘30s, a fascinating period in Black American cultural history.

-Michael Cuscuna

Read Interview…

Follow: Mosaic Records Facebook Tumblr Twitter

Yes and yes.

There’s some chatter about Nonesuch Records in my lede for this Black Keys review. What’s funny (but not ha-ha funny) about Patrick Carney’s prank is the idea that Quartzazium, his fake New Age group, might actually have a fair chance at the label, if it were actually any good. As you may recall, New Age is having a bit of a moment. (Part of me wonders whether Carney and Dan Auerbach, of Akron, pulled this particular prank as a jab at  Emeralds front man Mark McGuire, of Cleveland. Let’s agree to call this my Baseless Internecine Ohio Indie-Rock Grudge Theory.)
But back to Nonesuch. This morning it was announced that the label will celebrate its 50th anniversary with a series co-presented by BAM’s Next Wave Festival. It will take place this September, and looks to be pretty great. There’s nothing you’d call “New Age” here, but some of it comes… kind of close? In a good way? More intel below.

Tickets for all performances are on sale May 28 (May 21 for Friends of BAM), and can be purchased at BAM.org or by calling BAM Ticket Services at 718.636.4100.
Complete schedule of events: 
Sep 9—11: The Philip Glass Ensemble & Steve Reich and Musicians (Howard Gilman Opera House)Sep 9: Brad Mehldau  (Harvey Theater)Sep 10: Brad Mehldau & Chris Thile (Harvey Theater)Sep 11: Dawn Upshaw and Gilbert Kalish (Harvey Theater)Sep 12 & 13: Alarm Will Sound (Harvey Theater)Sep 12 & 13: Youssou N’Dour (Howard Gilman Opera House)Sep 18: Rhiannon Giddens (Howard Gilman Opera House)Sep 19: Devendra Banhart, Stephin Merritt, and Iron and Wine (Howard Gilman Opera House)Sep 20: Kronos Quartet, Natalie Merchant, Rhiannon Giddens, Sam Amidon, and Olivia Chaney (Howard Gilman Opera House)Sep 23—27: Landfall, Laurie Anderson, Kronos Quartet (Harvey Theater)Sep 24: Rokia Traoré, Toumani Diabaté, and Sidiki Diabaté  (Howard Gilman Opera House)Sep 25 & 26: Caetano Veloso (Howard Gilman Opera House)Sep 27 & 28: Robert Plant and the Sensational Space Shifters View high resolution

There’s some chatter about Nonesuch Records in my lede for this Black Keys review. What’s funny (but not ha-ha funny) about Patrick Carney’s prank is the idea that Quartzazium, his fake New Age group, might actually have a fair chance at the label, if it were actually any good. As you may recall, New Age is having a bit of a moment. (Part of me wonders whether Carney and Dan Auerbach, of Akron, pulled this particular prank as a jab at  Emeralds front man Mark McGuire, of Cleveland. Let’s agree to call this my Baseless Internecine Ohio Indie-Rock Grudge Theory.)

But back to Nonesuch. This morning it was announced that the label will celebrate its 50th anniversary with a series co-presented by BAM’s Next Wave Festival. It will take place this September, and looks to be pretty great. There’s nothing you’d call “New Age” here, but some of it comes… kind of close? In a good way? More intel below.

Tickets for all performances are on sale May 28 (May 21 for Friends of BAM), and can be purchased at BAM.org or by calling BAM Ticket Services at 718.636.4100.

Complete schedule of events: 

Sep 9—11: The Philip Glass Ensemble & Steve Reich and Musicians (Howard Gilman Opera House)
Sep 9: Brad Mehldau  (Harvey Theater)
Sep 10: Brad Mehldau & Chris Thile (Harvey Theater)
Sep 11: Dawn Upshaw and Gilbert Kalish (Harvey Theater)
Sep 12 & 13: Alarm Will Sound (Harvey Theater)
Sep 12 & 13: Youssou N’Dour (Howard Gilman Opera House)
Sep 18: Rhiannon Giddens (Howard Gilman Opera House)
Sep 19: Devendra Banhart, Stephin Merritt, and Iron and Wine (Howard Gilman Opera House)
Sep 20: Kronos Quartet, Natalie Merchant, Rhiannon Giddens, Sam Amidon, and Olivia Chaney (Howard Gilman Opera House)
Sep 23—27Landfall, Laurie Anderson, Kronos Quartet (Harvey Theater)
Sep 24: Rokia Traoré, Toumani Diabaté, and Sidiki Diabaté  (Howard Gilman Opera House)
Sep 25 & 26: Caetano Veloso (Howard Gilman Opera House)
Sep 27 & 28: Robert Plant and the Sensational Space Shifters

Stretch Music, he calls it. I didn’t have room to elaborate on what that means, but I tried to talk about how it sounds. 
Christian aTunde Adjuah Dectet at Harlem Stage Gatehouse. Photo: Brian Harkin for The New York Times. View high resolution

Stretch Music, he calls it. I didn’t have room to elaborate on what that means, but I tried to talk about how it sounds. 

Christian aTunde Adjuah Dectet at Harlem Stage Gatehouse. Photo: Brian Harkin for The New York Times.

Ultralite Powered by Tumblr | Designed by:Doinwork